Northeast ADA Center News Bulletin

February 15, 2017 two service dogs

Greetings Northeast ADA Center Listserv!

Here is the latest News Bulletin in both English and Spanish. To read all the news in Spanish, please scroll down. You can access past archived News Bulletins from our website at: https://northeastada.org/news-events.

As always, for any ADA related questions please contact us at 1.800.949.4232 and northeastada@cornell.edu.

Sincerely,
Northeast ADA Center


Updates from the Northeast ADA Center

Northeast ADA Center Operating Hours Have Changed

Please note that the Northeast ADA Center's technical assistance line hours of operation have changed to 8:30am to 4:30pm Monday through Friday.  The Northeast ADA Center will still remain closed on all federal holidays. Technical assistance questions can always be submitted any time of day to us via email, at northeastada@cornell.edu and a response will be provided within one to two business days.

What's New in Our Region

University Under Investigation After Student Denied Service Dog

Fordham University denied a student's request for a service dog to live with her on campus, despite her documented disability with the Office of Disability Services. She submitted her request shortly after transferring to Fordham College at Lincoln Center (FCLC) and moving into McMahon Hall in the spring semester of 2016. On August 4th, just before she began her junior year, the U.S. Department of Education (DOE) opened an investigation based on her allegations. Since then, the university offered her $5,000 during settlement proceedings, which she rejected. Since the two parties have not reached a resolution, the investigation is currently still open.

Read more about this at: http://www.fordhamobserver.com/fordham-under-investigation-after-student-denied-service-dog/

Determined Teen Finally Allowed to Bring Service Dog to School

While Ben Shore, 16, and his service dog Charlie were standing outside Cherry Hill High School East Thursday morning, a woman he didn't know rolled down her car window.  "Ben, have a nice day at school," she said.  Shore said that he has had support from strangers and students in his fight to be able to bring his golden doodle service dog to school.  The fight apparently ended this week, when the school administration in an abrupt about-face, told Shore he could bring the dog without jumping through the hoops spelled out in their official policy.  After talking with reporters outside the school, a clearly excited Shore joined the flow of students heading inside, accompanied by his father, Eric Shore.  Asked what led to the district's decision to allow the dog, spokeswoman Barbara Wilson said only that it related to the Board of Education's upcoming vote Feb. 14 on a revised service dog policy.  "In the meantime, the district decided to allow a service dog to accompany a student to Cherry Hill High School East in advance of the adoption of the revised policy, as we work to be in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act," To read more about this go to: http://www.nj.com/camden/index.ssf/2017/02/school_allows_service_dog_in_school_after_months_o.html

What's New in the Rest of the Country

Mark Richardson worked for the Chicago Transit Authority as a Bus Operator from 1999 to 2012.  He took an extended medical leave from work and attempted to return to his job in September 2010.  The Authority sent him for a fitness exam, and the doctor cleared Richardson to return to work. He was next required to submit to a safety assessment, which he contended turned out to be different than the normal safety assessment required of bus operators.  The Authority eventually rejected his request to return to work.  Richardson then filed a charge with the EEOC, stating that the Authority discriminated against him based on his disability, namely severe obesity.  After the parties were not able to resolve the charge, Richardson sued in federal court. The Authority argued that obesity is not a disability unless it is due to a physiological disorder and further contended that since the plaintiff never alleged that there was a physiological basis for his obesity, his complaint must be dismissed. Ultimately, the court noted that the plaintiff's complaint was sufficient to allow him to move forward with discovery and to attempt to prove his case. This is an interesting case because obesity claims are likely to become a major area of litigation given both the near epidemic levels of obesity in the United States and the expansion of coverage of disability under the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). To read more about the case go to: http://www.workerscompensation.com/compnewsnetwork/workers-comp-blogwire/25275-employee-can-proceed-on-ada-claim-that-he-was-discriminated-against-on-account-of-severe-obesity-nwcdn-new-jersey-member.html

EEOC: Workplace Disability Discrimination Claims Set New Record

For the second year in a row, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said charges of job bias related to disability hit an all-time high, reaching 28,073 for the 2016 fiscal year. Of these complaints, 5,680 were resolved in favor of the person who brought the complaint. The EEOC also noted that nearly a third of the complaints they received cited disability. Read more at: https://www.disabilityscoop.com/2017/02/06/workplace-disability-new-record/23274/

For the Traveler with a Disability, Strategies for a Successful Trip

Terry Scott Cohen, 42, enjoys roller coasters, mushing in Alaska and tobogganing in the Pyrenees Mountains. Though he gets about in a motorized scooter, he has not let his myotonic dystrophy, a disease involving progressive muscle loss, curtail his travels. His father, Barry M. Cohen, 72, a retired industrial psychologist, acts as his travel companion, and together the two Floridians have written a book, "Travel Near & Travel Far: Step Out of Your Disabled World!" that provides both encouragement for travelers with disabilities and practical advice on navigating the world from a scooter or wheelchair. The elder Mr. Cohen recently discussed the book. To read more about that conversation go to: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/03/travel/disabled-traveler-strategies-for-a-successful-trip.html

Opportunities for You!

Free Webinar - Self-Evaluations and Transition Plans: Some Considerations

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

2:00 PM EST - 3:30 PM EST

All public entities subject to Title II of the ADA must complete a self-evaluation, and those with 50 or more employees must also have a transition plan that addresses structural changes that are necessary for achieving program accessibility. Learn how to conduct a self-evaluation and how to integrate the information gathered into a transition plan.

To register, go to: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07edo3a3f61059e082&oseq=&c=&ch=

Free Webinar - Employer Practices to Improve Employment Outcomes: Considerations Across the Employment Process-

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

2:00 PM EST - 3:30 PM EST

There is increasing interest in the business community in finding the best ways to hire and retain individuals with disabilities. New assistive technologies, features and applications are creating more employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Virtual offices and mobile technologies enable work by anyone, anytime, anywhere.

This presentation provides an overview of effective workplace disability inclusive practices across the employment process and includes recruitment and hiring, career advancement and retention, compensation and benefits, accessibility and accommodation, diversity and inclusion, and metrics and analytics. The information is taken from research that examined the most effective ways to minimize disability discrimination and maximize workplace disability inclusion.

To register go to: https://adata.org/event/employer-practices-improve-employment-outcomes-considerations-across-employment-process

Free Webinar - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Final Rule

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

2:30 PM ET- 4:00 PM ET

 The Access Board, under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, has published a final standard addressing access for people with disabilities to medical diagnostic equipment. The standards provide design criteria that will allow independent access to diagnostic equipment, including types that require transfer from wheelchairs and other mobility aids. Provisions address transfer surfaces, support rails, armrests, compatibility with lift devices, and other features to facilitate transfer. This session will provide an overview of this important rulemaking. To register, go to: https://www.accessibilityonline.org/ao/session/?id=110590

2017 Disability Rights Storytellers Fellowship - Deadline to Apply: 3-15-17

The Disability Rights Storytellers Fellowship managed by Rooted in Rights and AAPD provides the opportunity for an individual with a disability to learn and apply skills in digital media storytelling, and to connect with media professionals to prepare participants for advanced careers in media production, journalism, online advocacy, or digital design. The project combines hands-on training on cutting edge technologies with a strong foundation in developing the individual's voice and using story-driven videos in advocacy.  Upon admission to the project, Rooted in Rights will send a pre-tested, pre-assembled video production kit to the Fellow. The project kicks off with orientation sessions in which  Rooted in Rights creative professionals and AAPD staff lead workshops on the history of the disability rights movement, current policy issues, and the media's role in the disability rights movement as well as technical workshops focused on video technique, script writing, digital storytelling, basic camera composition, and video editing.

In addition to hands-on workshops, the Fellow will participate in video chats and Q&A's with media professionals, including people with disabilities, to receive advice on how to break into the media industry. AAPD will also work to connect the Fellow to internships and employment opportunities. Because work in the Storytellers Fellowship is not a full time commitment and can be completed from anywhere, the Fellow would have the opportunity to begin work or internships simultaneously.  To apply go to: http://www.aapd.com/disability-rights-storytellers/

Special Spotlight

Animation on Signs Now Available from the U.S. Access Board

A new animation on accessible signage is now available from the U.S. Access Board as part of its online guide to standards issued under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA). The 15-minute animated film reviews and illustrates requirements in the standards for signs and clarifies common sources of confusion. It covers provisions for visual access, tactile signs, required access symbols and other pictograms.

"We're excited to make this resource available so that the provisions for signs are correctly understood and applied," states Marsha Mazz, Director of the Board's Office of Technical and Information Services. "The Board receives many questions on this subject, and the new animation is very effective in answering them."

The signs animation is the latest in a series produced by the Access Board. Other animations address wheelchair maneuvering, entrances and doors, toilet and bathing facilities, protruding objects, and parking and passenger loading zones. The animations are viewable on the Board's site, and copies of them can be downloaded as well.

The Board's online guide to the ADA and ABA Standards also features technical bulletins that explain and illustrate requirements and address common questions. Bulletins are currently available on the first five chapters of the standards, including application and scoping, building blocks, accessible routes, accessible means of egress, parking and passenger loading zones, and stairways. The Guide to the ADA Standards covers design requirements for places of public accommodation, commercial facilities, and state and local government facilities subject to the ADA. The Guide to the ABA Standards addresses similar standards that apply under the ABA to facilities that are federally funded.

Future installments to the guides will be released as they become available. Users can sign-up to receive email updates on the release of other animations and bulletins in the series by going here: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USACCESS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USACCESS_28

Cambio en el Horario del Centro ADA del Noreste

Por favor, entérese que la línea de asistencia técnica del Centro ADA del Noreste cambio su horario de operaciones. El nuevo horario es de 8:30am a 4:30pm, de lunes a viernes.  El Centro aún permanecerá cerrado todos los días feriados. Puede someter sus preguntas de asistencia técnica a cualquier hora del día, por correo electrónico, a northeastada@cornell.edu y le responderemos en uno o dos días laborables.

Universidad bajo Investigación Luego de que a una Estudiante se le Negara la Asistencia de un Perro de Servicio

La Universidad de Fordham le negó a una estudiante una solicitud para hospedar a un perro de servicio con ella en el recinto, a pesar de su impedimento documentado en la Oficina de Servicios para Impedimentos. La estudiante sometió la solicitud poco después de transferirse a la Universidad de Fordham en el Lincoln Center (FCLC, por sus siglas en inglés) y mudarse a McMahon Hall en el semestre de primavera del 2016. El 4 de agosto, justo antes de que empezara su tercer año en la universidad, el Departamento de Educación de los Estados Unidos (DOE, por sus siglas en inglés) inició una investigación basada en sus alegaciones.  Desde ese momento, la universidad le ofreció $5,000 durante los procedimientos de solución, los cuales ella rechazó. Como ambas partes no han alcanzado una resolución, actualmente la investigación continúa abierta.

Lea más sobre este asunto en: http://www.fordhamobserver.com/fordham-under-investigation-after-student-denied-service-dog/

Finalmente, a un Adolescente Decidido se le Permite Traer un Perro de Servicio a la Escuela

Mientras Ben Shore, de 16 años de edad, y su perro de servicio, Charlie, estaban esperando fuera de la escuela superior, Cherry Hill High School East, el jueves en la mañana, una mujer que él no conocía bajó el cristal de su vehículo.  Le dijo, "Ben, que tengas un bonito día en la escuela".  Shore dijo que ha contado con el  apoyo tanto de desconocidos, como de sus compañeros, en su lucha para poder traer a su perro de servicio, de raza golden doodle (mezcla de golden retriever y poodle) a la escuela.  Aparentemente, la disputa terminó esta semana cuando la administración de la escuela cambió repentinamente de opinión y le indicó a Shore que podía traer el perro, pues estaba escrito en su política oficial. Luego de hablar con los reporteros fuera de la escuela, Shore, muy emocionado, se unió al estudiantado que se dirigía a entrar a la escuela, acompañado por su padre, Eric Shore.  En respuesta a la pregunta de qué llevó al distrito a tomar la decisión de permitir al perro, Barbara Wilson, la portavoz, expresó que esto se relacionaba con la votación de la Junta Escolar el próximo 14 de febrero, sobre una política revisada de perros de servicio.  "Mientras tanto, el distrito decidió permitir que el perro de servicio acompañara al estudiante a la escuela Cherry Hill High School East antes de la aprobación de la política revisada, mientras trabajamos para estar en cumplimiento con la Ley de Estadounidenses con Impedimentos".  Para leer más sobre el tema, visite: http://www.nj.com/camden/index.ssf/2017/02/school_allows_service_dog_in_school_after_months_o.html

Un Empleado Puede Proceder con una Reclamación sobre la Ley ADA al Ser Discriminado por su Obesidad Severa

Mark Richardson trabajó para la Autoridad de Tránsito de Chicago como operador de autobuses desde el 1999 hasta el 2012.  Tomó una licencia médica extendida de empleo e intentó regresar a su trabajo en septiembre de 2010.  La Autoridad lo envió a tomar un examen físico y el doctor le dio el visto bueno a Richardson para regresar a trabajar. Posteriormente, se le requirió someterse a una evaluación de seguridad, la cual afirmó que resultó ser diferente a las evaluaciones de seguridad normales que les requieren a los operadores de autobuses.  Eventualmente, la Autoridad rechazó su solicitud para regresar a trabajar.  Entonces, Richardson presentó una querella a la Comisión para la Igualdad de Oportunidades en el Empleo (EEOC, por sus siglas en inglés) basada en su impedimento, es decir, obesidad severa.  Luego de que las partes no pudieran resolver, Richardson presentó una demanda en la corte federal. La Autoridad argumentó que la obesidad no es un impedimento, a menos que sea a causa de un desorden fisiológico. Además, afirmaron que como el demandante nunca alegó que hubiese una condición fisiológica para su obesidad, su reclamo debiera ser desestimado. Finalmente, el tribunal manifestó que el reclamo del demandante era suficiente para permitirle continuar con su descubrimiento de pruebas e intentar probar su caso. Este es un caso interesante porque es probable que los reclamos sobre obesidad se conviertan en un área de litigio mayor, dado los niveles epidémicos de obesidad en los Estados Unidos y la expansión de cobertura en cuanto a impedimentos bajo las Enmiendas de la Ley ADA de 2008 (ADAAA, por sus siglas en inglés). Para leer más acerca de este caso, visite: http://www.workerscompensation.com/compnewsnetwork/workers-comp-blogwire/25275-employee-can-proceed-on-ada-claim-that-he-was-discriminated-against-on-account-of-severe-obesity-nwcdn-new-jersey-member.html

EEOC: Se Establecen Nuevos Récords de Discrimen por Impedimentos en el Área de Trabajo

Por segundo año consecutivo, la Comisión para la Igualdad de Oportunidades en el Empleo de los EE. UU. expresó que los cargos por discriminación, relacionados a impedimentos, en el lugar de empleo llegaron a niveles sin precedentes alcanzando 28,073 para el año fiscal de 2016. De estas reclamaciones 5,680 fueron resueltas a favor de la persona que presentó la reclamación.  La EEOC también señaló que casi un tercio de los reclamos que recibieron citaban impedimentos como la razón para el discrimen. Lea más en: https://www.disabilityscoop.com/2017/02/06/workplace-disability-new-record/23274/

Estrategias para un Viaje Exitosos para los Viajeros con Impedimentos

Terry Scott Cohen, de 42 años de edad, disfruta de las montañas rusas, pasear en trineo en Alaska y subirse a toboganes en los Pirineos. A pesar de que se mueve en una silla motorizada, él no ha permitido que su distrofia miotónica, una enfermedad que consiste en pérdida muscular progresiva, limite sus viajes.  Su padre, Barry M. Cohen, de 72 años, un sicólogo industrial retirado, actúa como su compañero de viajes. Juntos, estos dos floridianos escribieron un libro, Travel Near & Travel Far: Step Out of Your Disabled World!” que alienta a los viajeros con impedimentos, a la vez que provee consejos prácticos para navegar el mundo desde un sillón de ruedas o una silla motorizada. Recientemente, el mayor de los Barry conversó acerca del libro.  Para leer más sobre esta conversación, visite:  https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/03/travel/disabled-traveler-strategies-for-a-successful-trip.html

Autoevaluaciones y Planes de Transición: Algunas Consideraciones- Webinar Gratuito

jueves, 16 de febrero de 2017

2:00 PM EST – 3:30 PM EST

 Todas las entidades públicas sujetas al Título II de la Ley ADA deben completar una autoevaluación. Aquellas con 50 empleados o más también deben tener un plan de transición que aborde los cambios estructurales necesarios para lograr la accesibilidad al programa. Aprenda cómo preparar una autoevaluación y cómo integrar la información recopilada a un plan de transición.

Para inscribirse, visite: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07edo3a3f61059e082&oseq=&c=&ch=

Webinar Gratuito- Prácticas de los Patronos para Mejorar los Resultados en el Empleo: Consideraciones Durante Todo el Proceso de Empleo

martes, 21 de febrero de 2017

2:00 PM EST – 3:30 PM EST

Hay un aumento en el interés de la comunidad empresarial por encontrar las mejores maneras de contratar y retener personas con impedimentos.  Las nuevas tecnologías, aspectos y aplicaciones de asistencia están creando más oportunidades de empleo para personas con impedimentos. Las oficinas virtuales y las tecnologías móviles permiten que cualquiera trabaje, a cualquier hora, desde cualquier lugar.

Esta presentación provee un panorama de prácticas de inclusión en cuanto a impedimentos en el ámbito laboral a través del proceso de empleo. También incluye el reclutamiento y la contratación, desarrollo profesional y retención, compensación y beneficios, accesibilidad y alojamiento, diversidad e inclusión, además de métricas y análisis de datos. La información se toma de una investigación que examinó las maneras más efectivas para minimizar el discrimen por impedimentos y maximizar la inclusión de los impedimentos en el lugar de trabajo.

Para inscribirse, visite:  https://adata.org/event/employer-practices-improve-employment-outcomes-considerations-across-employment-process

Webinar Gratuito - Regla Final sobre el Equipo de Diagnóstico Médico

jueves, 2 de marzo de 2017

2:30 PM ET- 4:00 PM ET

 Bajo la Ley de Protección al Paciente y Cuidado de Salud Asequible, el Consejo de Acceso publicó un estándar final acerca del acceso a equipos de diagnóstico médico para las personas con impedimentos. Los estándares proveen criterios de diseño que permitirán el acceso independiente al equipo diagnóstico, incluyendo los tipos de equipo que requieren traslado de sillas de ruedas y otra asistencia de movilidad. Estas disposiciones se enfocan en las superficies que se utilizan para el traslado, barandas de apoyo, reposabrazos, compatibilidad con aparatos de elevación y otros particulares para facilitar el traslado.  Esta sesión proveerá un panorama de esta iniciativa regulatoria importante.  Para inscribirse, visite: https://www.accessibilityonline.org/ao/session/?id=110590

Beca para los Narradores de los Derechos de las Personas con Impedimentos de 2017 - La fecha límite para solicitar es el: 15 de marzo de 2017

 Beca para los Narradores de los Derechos de las Personas con Impedimentos administrada por Rooted in Rights y  la Asociación Estadounidense de Personas con Impedimentos (AAPD, por sus siglas en inglés), le proveen la oportunidad a una persona con impedimentos de aprender y utilizar habilidades narrativas en medios digitales y hacer conexiones con profesionales en el campo de los medios. De esta manera preparan a los participantes en carreras avanzadas en producción de medios, periodismo, defensa de derechos e

Animation on Signs Now Available from the U.S. Access Board

A new animation on accessible signage is now available from the U.S. Access Board as part of its online guide to standards issued under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA). The 15-minute animated film reviews and illustrates requirements in the standards for signs and clarifies common sources of confusion. It covers provisions for visual access, tactile signs, required access symbols and other pictograms.

"We're excited to make this resource available so that the provisions for signs are correctly understood and applied," states Marsha Mazz, Director of the Board's Office of Technical and Information Services. "The Board receives many questions on this subject, and the new animation is very effective in answering them."

The signs animation is the latest in a series produced by the Access Board. Other animations address wheelchair maneuvering, entrances and doors, toilet and bathing facilities, protruding objects, and parking and passenger loading zones. The animations are viewable on the Board's site, and copies of them can be downloaded as well.

The Board's online guide to the ADA and ABA Standards also features technical bulletins that explain and illustrate requirements and address common questions. Bulletins are currently available on the first five chapters of the standards, including application and scoping, building blocks, accessible routes, accessible means of egress, parking and passenger loading zones, and stairways. The Guide to the ADA Standards covers design requirements for places of public accommodation, commercial facilities, and state and local government facilities subject to the ADA. The Guide to the ABA Standards addresses similar standards that apply under the ABA to facilities that are federally funded.

Future installments to the guides will be released as they become available. Users can sign-up to receive email updates on the release of other animations and bulletins in the series by going here: https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USACCESS/subscriber/new?topic_id=USACCESS_28

The contents of this News Bulletin were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90DP0088-01-00). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this News Bulletin do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, or HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.